Dementia

Bệnh Alzheimer và Chăm Sóc (Alzheimer’s Disease and Caregiving)

Tổng quan

Safe at Home: 3. Kitchen Safety

Consider these daily kitchen situations and learn how to make the kitchen a safer space for someone with dementia.

Note: This information is not meant to replace the advice from a medical professional. You should consult your health care provider regarding specific medical concerns or treatment.

Safe At Home: 5. Bedroom Safety

Consider these daily bedroom situations and learn how to make the bedroom a safer space for someone with dementia.

Note: This information is not meant to replace the advice from a medical professional. You should consult your health care provider regarding specific medical concerns or treatment.
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Safe At Home: 4. Bathroom Safety

Consider these daily bathroom situations and learn how to make the bathroom a safer space for someone with dementia.

6. Behavioral Issues (Caregiver College Video Series)

One of the biggest challenges a caregiver can face is changes to a loved one's behavior. Learn how to best approach these behavioral issues for your care recipient.

3. Dental Care (Caregiver College Video Series)

Dental and oral care are important at any age to prevent against a variety of health problems. Learn how to assist as a caregiver in daily cleaning and routine check-ups. 

Note: This information is not meant to replace the advice from a medical professional. You should consult your health care provider regarding specific medical concerns or treatment.

Guía del Cuidador para Entender los Comportamientos Relacionados con la Demencia

Introducción

Bathing (for dementia)

  • People with dementia are often resistant to bathing. They will claim they just showered, or that they will do it later, or outright refuse to bathe. Unless someone is incontinent, daily bathing is not necessary. Pick your battles—once or twice a week may be sufficient. Coupling bathing with an activity is sometimes helpful, e.g. going to the doctor or out to lunch or having a bowl of ice cream.

HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorder (HAND)

Since the start of the AIDS epidemic more than three decades ago, doctors, family and friend caregivers, and patients have observed that some people with the disease experience decline in brain function and movement skills, as well as shifts in behavior and mood. This disorder is called HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorder, or “HAND.” Although advances in antiretroviral therapy from the past two decades have decreased the severity of HAND, symptoms still persist in 30–50% of people living with HIV. For many people, these symptoms continue to affect activities of daily living.

Now it is My Turn to Be There for Him

My name is Julie Pacheco, I'm 47 years old and I take care of my step father Jack who is 90 years old. He suffers from dementia.

When I was 26 my mother married this man and he became a part of our crazy, dysfunctional family. By dysfunctional  I mean mainly myself, who at that time, was a single mother sufferring from the disease of addiction.

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