Dementia

Guia del cuidador para entender la conducta de los pacientes con demencia (Caregiver's Guide to Understanding Dementia Behaviors)

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Sara Kruse: Going the Extra Mile

At FCA, we always need help with mailings, filing, organizing the library, tabulating survey results and sorting out our many materials, so when Sara Kruse approached FCA’s Program Director Donna Schempp to ask if we needed volunteer help, we were thrilled.

Sara started coming to the office once a week and soon became invaluable to the workings of FCA. She has helped us for the past three years, but she is now moving to the Northernmost part of California, and will be sorely missed around the office.

Toileting (for dementia)

  • Set up the bathroom to make it as easy as possible for the person to get on to and off of the toilet, e.g. having a raised toilet seat and grab bars.
     
  • Notice when the person gives a sign about needing to use the toilet, e.g. agitation, fidgeting, tugging on clothing, wandering, touching the genital area. Have a routine and take the person to the bathroom on a regular schedule, e.g. every two hours. You may have to respond quickly if someone indicates they need to use the bathroom.
     

Incontinence (for dementia)

Talk to the physician to see if medication, enlarged prostate or a urinary tract infection might be causing the problem, especially if there is a sudden onset of incontinence.
 

Dressing and Grooming (for dementia)

  • Simplify clothing choices by putting out an outfit for the care receiver to wear, or give an option of two outfits. Do not ask open-ended questions like, "What do you want to wear?"—this kind of question can overwhelm someone with dementia.
     

Dental Care (for dementia)

  • Dental hygiene is important for overall health. Poor dental hygiene may lead to heart disease, gingivitis, stroke, osteoporosis, and respiratory disease. In addition to causing bad breath, inadequate dental hygiene can also affect one's ability to eat, chew, and talk. Certain medications can cause "dry mouth." Dry mouth makes it more difficult to eat and swallow, produce saliva, and causes tongue irritation.
     

Communication (for dementia)

  • People respond to our body posture, facial expression, and tone of voice more than our actual words. Your upbeat mood can help keep the person you are dealing with remain calmer.
  • You need to pay attention to the non-verbal clues the person you are caring for is giving you. Understanding his/her feelings may be more important than the content of the conversation. Acknowledge feelings whenever possible.

Here But Not Here—Finding Hope When a Loved One Has Memory Loss

(Aired: November 14, 2007)

El cuidado de los adultos con trastornos cognitivos y de la memoria (Caring for Adults with Cognitive and Memory Impairments)

El cuidado del paciente: Una experiencia universal


事实表 : 是痴呆症吗? 什么是痴呆症? (Is this Dementia and What Does It Mean? - Chinese)

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