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Families, Tech and Caregiving Webinar Archives Now Available

Now Available: Two Archived Webinars on

How Emerging Technologies Can Help Caregiving Families

https://www.youtube.com/user/CAREGIVERdotORG

Dementia: Is This Dementia and What Does It Mean?

Introduction

What does it mean when someone is said to have dementia? For some people, the word conjures up scary images of “crazy” behavior and loss of control. In fact, the word dementia describes a group of symptoms that includes short-term memory loss, confusion, the inability to problem-solve, the inability to complete multi-step activities such as preparing a meal or balancing a checkbook, and, sometimes, personality changes or unusual behavior.

Family Caregiver Alliance launches an online service for family caregivers of adults with serious health conditions

For the first time, family caregivers can get support and information tailored for their situation—free, secure, and accessible 24/7

SAN FRANCISCO—September 12, 2017—Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) announces the launch of FCA CareJourney™, a dynamic online service, mobile-ready that delivers specialized information directly to family caregivers. Based on FCA’s 40 years of service and research experience and insights from families, CareJourney™ responds to the complicated needs of caregiving.

CJ Audio - Caregiver Relaxation

Placeholder article for CJ Audio - Caregiver Relaxation

 

Residential Care Options: Visiting Someone in Dementia Care

When someone has just moved into a dementia community

  • During the first two weeks, visit often and stay as long as you want.
    • If the facility has a policy of not allowing visitors for the first two weeks during the adjustment period, consider whether this is the right facility for you.
       
  • Announce yourself to your loved one: “Hi mom, it’s me, Susan.”
     
  • Introduce yourself to the staff.
     
  • Bring favorite foods. Decorate the room with familiar objects.

Residential Care Options: Caregiving Doesn't End When Your Loved One Moves

After your loved one moves to a facility, what happens? What is your role as a caregiver? How often should you visit? How can you best help your loved one adjust to their new living environment? How do you cope with your feelings about the move? Here are some tips to help you answer these questions and more.

Residential Care Options: Choosing the Right Place

What should you think about and do as you explore different residential care options? First, keep your own needs in mind as well as the needs of your loved one. Before visiting facilities, see the FCA Tip Sheet, Residential Care Options: The Right Time. Be sure you are ready for this decision—it will make it easier for you to look at all options with an open mind. There are many checklists and guides to help you evaluate care facilities. A few are listed at the end of this Tip Sheet.

 

Residential Care Options: Housing Options

Choosing the right place for a loved one to live, if not at home can be challenging. The options available depend on the kind of care that is needed, your loved one’s personal preferences, and finances. All facilities require a TB skin test and medical form completed by the doctor before admission.

Residential Care Options: The Right Time

Most caregivers are committed to keeping a frail or ill loved one at home as long as possible. Maybe they promised not to put the care receiver in a “nursing home”—the worst fear of many adults living with a debilitating illness. But there are many reasons why moving to residential care outside the home is not only necessary, but also the right thing to do. It is, however, a very difficult decision. Caregivers often struggle to care for a care receiver, waiting too long and compromising their own physical and emotional well-being, making the move even harder.

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