Daily or In-Home Caregiver

Trastorno neurocognitivo asociado con el VIH (HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorder — HAND)

Desde el comienzo de la epidemia del SIDA, más de tres décadas atrás, doctores, cuidadores familiares y amigos, y los propios pacientes han observado que algunas personas afectadas por la enfermedad experimentaban un deterioro de la función cerebral y de la capacidad de movimiento así como también cambios en el comportamiento y el estado de ánimo. Este trastorno recibió el nombre de trastorno neurocognitivo asociado al VIH (HIV‑associated Neurocognitive Disorder - HAND, por sus siglas en inglés).

So Tired From All My Parents' Doctor Appointments That I Hate Seeing One Myself

I have multiple illnesses and receive only SSI, though I did try to work some freelance after getting disability. I am currently living with, and trying to look after two parents. They are in their late 80s/early 90s and very luckily have only mild dementia. I attribute some of this to the fact that I am there and, being a person who is interested in many things, create a stimulating environment.

針對有失禁症狀之癡呆症患者的護理建議 (Incontinence and Dementia - Chinese)

針對有失禁症狀之癡呆症患者的護理建議

  • 與醫生討論失禁問題是否由藥物、前列腺增生或尿道感染引起,特別是突然出現失禁症狀的患者。

 

  • 研究各種失禁用品。市面上有許多失禁用襯墊和內衣。每個人的需要各有不同,應選擇最適合的產品。在防護內褲中加上襯墊能增加吸收量。不要稱之為成人紙尿褲,應稱作防護內褲。

 

  • 癡呆症患者通常對穿著防護內褲表現抗拒。可能需要一些技巧讓他們習慣穿著,例如,在早上穿衣服時將防護內褲自然地融合到穿衣的一部分。先把襯墊放在內褲裡,在失禁病人更換衣服或從廁所站起來時,把內褲遞給他們。如果病人表現出抗拒情緒,您可以對他們說「它能幫助我更好地照顧你,這樣我就不會擔心了」,或者可以說「這對您有好處,穿上它您就不用再趕忙跑去洗手間,也不必擔心因此摔倒了。」

 

  • 使用橡膠或一次性塑膠防護床墊、椅子、汽車座椅等。

 

Consejos para cuidadores de personas con demencia que sufren incontinencia (Incontinence)

  • Hable con el médico para determinar si los medicamentos, el agrandamiento de la próstata o una infección urinaria pueden estar causando el problema, especialmente en el caso de un inicio repentino de la incontinencia.

Advance Health Care Directives and POLST

The Advance Health Care Directive (ADHC) allows you to appoint someone (health care agent, attorney-in-fact, proxy, or surrogate) to make a decision for you if you cannot speak for yourself. It is also called the Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care, Natural Death Act, Directive to Physicians, or a Living Will. (The living will is slightly different; check on what is recognized in your state.) Every state recognizes the ADHC, but states have their own forms, as laws vary from state to state.

 

Making End-of-Life Decisions: What Are Your Important Papers?

As you face aging and the need to make plans for your future, you face having to make decisions about many aspects of your lives. These legal and health care decisions not only protect you from others making decisions for your care that you do not want, they also protect family and loved ones by giving them guidance in the care that you would like to receive. After completing all the legal paperwork, the next step is to sit down and talk to family about the decisions you have made and why.


 


Transferring a Person

Tips to Help Caregivers Move or Transfer a Loved One with Mobility Limitations

  • Learn proper body mechanics. Ask for a physical therapy referral from your physician to teach you how to use your body so you don’t get hurt.
     
  • Save your back. If you feel a strain, get help; don’t do it alone. This is for your safety and for the safety of the person you are trying to move. If you hurt your back, you aren’t going to be able to care for someone else.
     

Caregiver Self-Care: Caring for You

The care you give to yourself is the care you give to your loved one.

Keep these simple steps and strategies in mind to ensure that you as a caregiver find time and resources to take care of yourself.

I Lost My Job But I Cannot Leave Him to Get Another

My husband and I were watching a movie, sitting on couch on a Saturday night. He said he was tired as I got up and went to the kitchen. Then he said "I have a tremendous headache," then held his hand on the left side of his face, saying "my face feels numb, funny" . . . then his head fell back. I tried to talk to him. He was screaming "Oh no!" I called 911.

We Used to Love to Travel and Eat Out . . . Now, Nothing

My husband and I care for my grandma, age 94, with dementia. She moved in with us April 2013. I also go to another lady's home for one hour in the morning to get her showered, dressed and fed and for one hour in the evening for physical therapy and to get her into bed in the evening.

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