Daily or In-Home Caregiver

I Am in Dementia Prison with My Mom

My husband and I have been caring for my 92 year old mother for over five years. It has taken me almost that long to even  admit and verbalize that my mother has dementia. I always would just say that she was forgetful and then as time went on I added the word confused. In the last year she has also become anxious and panicky when we leave her home alone for a short period of time. Tonight, after I ran an errand for less than two hours, I returned to a frantic mother.

I focused on changing myself rather than ‘fixing’ my husband’s health

It was the beginning of 2013 and my husband and I hit rock bottom. Once again, another medication did not work. This was the 10th medication in 10 years my husband tried to relieve his chronic pain. He was depressed, angry, and began to talk about divorce. I was about to throw in the towel as well because I was experiencing caregiver burnout.

I Do Not Sweat the Small Stuff

I became a cargiver shortly after my divorce. I had quit my job in an attempt to salvage my marriage . . . not the best thing to do.

I moved in with my parents to assist them and I had a place to stay. Then 3 weeks later my dad required a triple bypass. This became a full time job with his recovery, and since he has Parkinson's disease, it was even more difficult.

Caring About the Adult TBI Survivor

My son Neil was seventeen when he sustained a traumatic brain injury at the hands of a drunk driver who hit him and his girlfriend Trista as they were walking. Trista was killed. That was ten years ago. Initially helpless in an intensive care unit, he had no choice but to allow his family to take care of him in a way that had not been necessary since he was a small boy. His father carried him to the bathroom. His brother fed him smoothies from a straw. I brushed his unruly curls, massaged his muscles and helped with the exercises his therapist recommended.
 

Family Caregiving and Transitional Care: A Critical Review (2012)

Living with Incontinence: Social and Emotional Challenges

Most people who live with incontinence do not tell anyone about it, often not even their doctor(s) and especially not their friends. Family members might be the ones to bring up the subject, especially if the house is beginning to smell or furniture is soiled. It’s not an easy conversation to have. If you are faced with incontinence, know that you are not alone. One in 15 Americans are searching for ways to deal with this very personal issue. Here are typical feelings associated with continence issues and some coping strategies to consider:

Hospital Discharge Planning: A Guide for Families and Caregivers

A trip to the hospital can be an intimidating event for patients and their families. As a caregiver, you are focused completely on your family memberʼs medical treatment, and so is the hospital staff. You might not be giving much thought to what happens when your relative leaves the hospital.

Digital Technology for the Family Caregiver

Thanks to advances in medicine and public health, people are living longer than ever before. This means more and more family caregivers are responsible for managing the diverse needs of a loved one with chronic illness or frailty. How can family caregivers attempt to balance this added responsibility along with their own personal needs, work, parenting and other demands in their lives?


Special Concerns of LGBT Caregivers

Introduction


As Americans live longer, greater attention is being paid to the concerns facing aging adults and caregivers. While many issues are the same for all older adults and those who care for them, some unique considerations arise for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people dealing with aging.


 


How Chosen Families Affect Caregiving


Caregiver Health

A Population at Risk

An estimated 44 million Americans age 18 and older provide unpaid assistance and support to older people and adults with disabilities who live in the community.1 The value of this unpaid labor force is estimated to be at least $306 billion annually,2 nearly double the combined costs of home health care ($43 billion) and nursing home care ($115 billion).3

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