Daily or In-Home Caregiver

Seeking That Elusive Good Night Sleep

Americans are more sleep-deprived than people in other countries. According to the National Sleep Foundation, most adults need between seven and nine hours of sleep each night for optimum performance, health, and safety. The Foundation advises: “When we don’t get adequate sleep, we accumulate a sleep debt that can be difficult to “pay back” if it becomes too big. The resulting sleep deprivation has been linked to health problems such as obesity and high blood pressure, negative mood and behavior, decreased productivity, and safety issues in the home, on the job, and on the road.”

Resources for Assistive Technology

For assistance finding and purchasing AT:


ABLEDATA

(800) 227-0216
www.abledata.com


Alliance for Technology Access

(415) 455-4575
www.ataccess.org


Center for Assistive Technology &

Environmental Access

(800) 726-9119
www.assistivetech.net

Introducing In-Home Care When Your Loved One Says ‘No’

Desperate though caregivers may be for a temporary respite from their care responsibilites, many care recipients are resistant to strangers coming into their home to help. The help may be perceived as an invasion of privacy, a loss of independence, or a waste of money. Yet in-home assistance is often critical in offering caregivers a break and time to relax and rejuvenate.

There are ways to make this transition easier. Here are some tips for making your loved one feel more comfortable with in-home help:

Adult Day Care for Alzheimer's: The First Day

The quiet stillness of morning had always been a soothing part of the routine Pat shared with her husband Tom. It was a private time for her to have her coffee, read the newspaper, and check emails. Tom rose a little later, made his own breakfast, and began to work at his desk. But now, with the progression of Tom’s Alzheimer’s disease, Pat counts her personal time among the many things which have slipped away. 

A Caregiver’s Pledge

  1. I will understand that I can’t care for anyone else if I don’t also care for myself. I will keep an image in my mind of putting the oxygen mask on myself first.
     
  2. I will remember that the only person I can change is myself. I cannot change my loved one who is ill, nor my family members.
     
  3. I will find opportunities to laugh, daily. These might come in movies, jokes, television, or with friends who can see the humor in my situation and remind me to do the same.
     

Diagnosing Dementia

What does it mean when someone is said to have dementia? For some people, the word conjures up scary images of “crazy” behavior and loss of control. In fact, the word dementia describes a group of symptoms that includes short-term memory loss, confusion, the inability to problem-solve, the inability to complete multi-step activities such as preparing a meal or balancing a checkbook, and, sometimes, personality changes or unusual behavior.

Choosing Assistive Technology

Assistive Technology—also called assistive devices, independent living aids, and adaptive equipment—can help your loved one live more independently. It may also make your job as a caregiver easier and more enjoyable.

Caregiverʼs Guide to Medications and Aging

Medications: A Double-Edged Sword

“Any symptom in an elderly patient should be considered a drug side effect until proved otherwise.”
Brown University Long-term Care Quality Letter, 1995

Caregiving and the holidays: from stress to success!

For many caregivers the holiday season gives rise to stress, frustration and anger, instead of peace and good will.

Caregivers may feel resentful towards other family members who they feel have not offered enough assistance. Managing care for someone who has a cognitive impairment may leave caregivers feeling that they will not be able to participate as fully as they would like in family gatherings. Already feeling overwhelmed with caregiving tasks, stressed-out caregivers may view traditional holiday preparations as more of a drain of precious energy than a joy.

社區看護選擇 (Community Care Options)

The following Fact Sheet is available as downloadable PDF document. To view and print this file you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader. It is available as a free download by clicking here.

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