New to Caregiving

Dementia: Is this Dementia and What Does it Mean?


What does it mean when someone is said to have dementia? For some people, the word conjures up scary images of “crazy” behavior and loss of control. In fact, the word dementia describes a group of symptoms that includes short-term memory loss, confusion, the inability to problem-solve, the inability to complete multi-step activities such as preparing a meal or balancing a checkbook, and, sometimes, personality changes or unusual behavior.

Todo lo que un cuidador debe saber sobre el dinero (What Every Caregiver Needs to Know About Money)

Photo credit:
Used under Creative Commons license
conversation . . L1067630 []
Copyright 2008 Susan Sermoneta

What Every Caregiver Needs to Know About Money

Photo credit:
Used under Creative Commons license
conversation . . L1067630 []
Copyright 2008 Susan Sermoneta

Medios para una comunicación eficaz para proveedores de atención médica y cuidadores

Cuando un ser querido necesita atención médica, tradicionalmente recurrimos a profesionales para despejar dudas, obtener un diagnóstico certero y opciones de tratamiento. En el pasado, los médicos eran la autoridad indiscutible que llevaba la voz cantante en las discusiones con sus pacientes sobre atención médica. Pero las cosas han cambiado, y la relación con el médico también.

Pathways to Effective Communication For Healthcare Providers and Caregivers

Any time our loved ones need medical care we traditionally rely on professionals to answer our questions, diagnose properly, and recommend treatments. In the past, doctors were unquestioned authorities who took the lead in discussions with their patients on medical care. But things have changed; the relationship has shifted.

Where to Find My Important Papers

Click here to download a PDF of this form to print or fill out on your computer.

A Caregiver’s Bill of Rights

I have the right . . .

  • To take care of myself.  This is not an act of selfishness. It will give me the capacity of taking better care of my relative.
  • To seek help from others even though my relative may object. I recognize the limits of my own endurance and strength.
  • To maintain facets of my own life that do not include the person I care for, just as I would if he or she were healthy. I know that I do everything that I reasonably can for this person, and I have the right to do some things for myself.

Legal Planning for Incapacity

As you face aging and the need to make plans for your future, you face having to make legal decisions about many aspects of your lives. These legal decisions not only protect you from others doing things you might not like to you, they also protect family and loved ones by giving them guidance in the care that you would like to receive. After completing all the legal paperwork, the next step is to sit down and talk to family about the decisions you have made and why.


Advance Health Care Directives and POLST

The Advance Health Care Directive (ADHC) allows you to appoint someone (health care agent, attorney-in-fact, proxy or surrogate) to make a decision for you if you can not speak for yourself. It is also called the Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care, Natural Death Act, Directive to Physicians or a Living Will. (The living will is slightly different; check on what is recognized in your state.) Every state recognizes the ADHC, but states have their own forms, as laws vary from state to state.


Emergency Preparedness Checklist for Caregivers

Floods, earthquakes, tornados, snowstorms . . . wherever you live, there likely exists the potential for a variety of natural disasters that can create an emergency situation. When you're caring for a loved one, it's times like these that you'll be thankful for having prepared for such a situation.

Please use this checklist to organize your emergency preparations. It should be used in conjunction with the Where to Find My Important Papers checklist.



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