New to Caregiving

Understanding Palliative/Supportive Care: What Every Caregiver Should Know

Palliative care, also increasingly known as Supportive Care, may be one of the most misunder­stood terms in healthcare. Many people believe it’s the same as hospice care and it means the end of life. But palliative care is different from hospice, and when put in place, palliative care can bring hope, control, and a chance at a better quality of life for seriously ill patients and their caregivers.

Guía del Cuidador para Entender los Comportamientos Relacionados con la Demencia

Introducción

Caregiver Statistics: Demographics

Definitions

A caregiver—sometimes called an informal caregiver—is an unpaid individual (for example, a spouse, partner, family member, friend, or neighbor) involved in assisting others with activities of daily living and/or medical tasks. Formal caregivers are paid care providers providing care in one's home or in a care setting (day care, residential facility, long-term care facility). For the purposes of the present fact sheet, displayed statistics generally refer to caregivers of adults.

Who is a Caregiver at the Age of 20? Advice From a Young Caregiver

I was 19 years old when my Mom was diagnosed with Metastatic Small Cell Lung Cancer, which had a low survival rate. I was in my second semester of college so the idea of caregiving was not exactly making sense to me. Who is a caregiver at the age of 20? That’s for older people! However, little did I know it was for people of all ages. There are caregivers that are 16, 15, 17. Never in my wildest dreams did I think I would caregive at 20. I am going to be honest and blunt for anyone that is the same age as me and is caregiving their single parent: It is not easy.

Todo lo que un cuidador debe saber sobre el dinero (What Every Caregiver Needs to Know About Money)

Photo credit:
Used under Creative Commons license
conversation . . L1067630 [http://bit.ly/1hoEHFw]

Medios para una comunicación eficaz para proveedores de atención médica y cuidadores (Spanish)

Cuando un ser querido necesita atención médica, tradicionalmente recurrimos a profesionales para despejar dudas, obtener un diagnóstico certero y opciones de tratamiento. En el pasado, los médicos eran la autoridad indiscutible que llevaba la voz cantante en las discusiones con sus pacientes sobre atención médica. Pero las cosas han cambiado, y la relación con el médico también.

Pathways to Effective Communication for Healthcare Providers and Caregivers

Any time our loved ones need medical care, we traditionally rely on professionals to answer our questions, diagnose properly, and recommend treatments. In the past, doctors were unquestioned authorities who took the lead in discussions with their patients on medical care. But things have changed; the relationship has shifted.

A Caregiver’s Bill of Rights

I have the right . . .

  • To take care of myself. This is not an act of selfishness. It will give me the capacity to take better care of my relative.
     
  • To seek help from others even though my relative may object. I recognize the limits of my own endurance and strength.
     
  • To maintain facets of my own life that do not include the person I care for, just as I would if he or she were healthy. I know that I do everything that I reasonably can for this person, and I have the right to do some things for myself.
     

Legal Planning for Incapacity

As you face aging and the need to make plans for your future, you face having to make legal decisions about many aspects of your lives. These legal decisions not only protect you from others doing things you might not like to you, they also protect family and loved ones by giving them guidance in the care that you would like to receive. After completing all the legal paperwork, the next step is to sit down and talk to family about the decisions you have made and why.

 

Advance Health Care Directives and POLST

The Advance Health Care Directive (ADHC) allows you to appoint someone (health care agent, attorney-in-fact, proxy, or surrogate) to make a decision for you if you cannot speak for yourself. It is also called the Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care, Natural Death Act, Directive to Physicians, or a Living Will. (The living will is slightly different; check on what is recognized in your state.) Every state recognizes the ADHC, but states have their own forms, as laws vary from state to state.

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - New to Caregiving