Preparing for Caregiving

Dementia: Is This Dementia and What Does It Mean?

Introduction

What does it mean when someone is said to have dementia? For some people, the word conjures up scary images of “crazy” behavior and loss of control. In fact, the word dementia describes a group of symptoms that includes short-term memory loss, confusion, the inability to problem-solve, the inability to complete multi-step activities such as preparing a meal or balancing a checkbook, and, sometimes, personality changes or unusual behavior.

Todo lo que un cuidador debe saber sobre el dinero (What Every Caregiver Needs to Know About Money)

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Copyright 2008 Susan Sermoneta
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A Caregiver’s Bill of Rights

I have the right . . .

  • To take care of myself. This is not an act of selfishness. It will give me the capacity to take better care of my relative.
     
  • To seek help from others even though my relative may object. I recognize the limits of my own endurance and strength.
     
  • To maintain facets of my own life that do not include the person I care for, just as I would if he or she were healthy. I know that I do everything that I reasonably can for this person, and I have the right to do some things for myself.
     

Legal Planning for Incapacity

As you face aging and the need to make plans for your future, you face having to make legal decisions about many aspects of your lives. These legal decisions not only protect you from others doing things you might not like to you, they also protect family and loved ones by giving them guidance in the care that you would like to receive. After completing all the legal paperwork, the next step is to sit down and talk to family about the decisions you have made and why.

 

Caregiver Self-Care: Caring for You

The care you give to yourself is the care you give to your loved one.

Keep these simple steps and strategies in mind to ensure that you as a caregiver find time and resources to take care of yourself.

San Francisco's Great Caregiving Resources

San Francisco is a GOOD place to be a caregiver!

 

Families and caregivers in San Francisco have access to some of the country’s most innovative programs to help care for loved ones with chronic or disabling health conditions like Alzheimer's, stroke and AIDS.

Digital Technology for the Family Caregiver

Thanks to advances in medicine and public health, people are living longer than ever before. This means more and more family caregivers are responsible for managing the diverse needs of a loved one with chronic illness or frailty. How can family caregivers attempt to balance this added responsibility along with their own personal needs, work, parenting and other demands in their lives?

Caregiving 101: Exploring the Complexities of Family Caregiving

Caregiving

Introduction

Caregiving takes many forms. Many of us help older, sick, or disabled family members and friends every day. We know we are helping, but we don't think of ourselves as caregivers. We are glad to do this and feel rewarded by it, but if the demands are heavy, over time we can also become exhausted and stressed. We think we should be able to handle caregiving roles on top of busy work and family schedules and begin to feel guilty and depressed as our stamina wanes.

Caregiver Wisdom: The Really Good Caregiver

Family Caregiver Alliance

From the voice of a family caregiver

Dear Caregivers,

I feel there is a tendency to think that only caregiving at home from the beginning of an illness to the end of someone’s life is the best care.  And somehow that your devotion and love for someone is only measured by how long you can stand taking care of them. And that that care should only conclude when they pass away at home.  I think this is some really unrealistic thinking.

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