Preparing for Caregiving

Special Concerns of LGBT Caregivers


As Americans live longer, greater attention is being paid to the concerns facing aging adults and caregivers. While many issues are the same for all older adults and those who care for them, some unique considerations arise for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people dealing with aging.


Caregiving 101: Exploring the Complexities of Family Caregiving



Caregiving takes many forms. Many of us help older, sick, or disabled family members and friends every day. We know we are helping, but we don't think of ourselves as caregivers. We are glad to do this and feel rewarded by it, but if the demands are heavy, over time we can also become exhausted and stressed. We think we should be able to handle caregiving roles on top of busy work and family schedules and begin to feel guilty and depressed as our stamina wanes.

Caregiver Wisdom: The Really Good Caregiver

Family Caregiver Alliance

From the voice of a family caregiver

Dear Caregivers,

I feel there is a tendency to think that only caregiving at home from the beginning of an illness to the end of someone’s life is the best care.  And somehow that your devotion and love for someone is only measured by how long you can stand taking care of them. And that that care should only conclude when they pass away at home.  I think this is some really unrealistic thinking.

Sea prudente...¡Vacúnese! (Be Wise...Immunize!)

Background Checking: Resources that Help

Stories fill the news about aides who take advantage of, rather than care for, a parent, spouse or other family member in their home. Drained savings accounts, missing jewelry, and unexplained bruises are all too common experiences. One way to avoid becoming a victim is to conduct an attendant background check. Background checks include: a review of job performance and verification that the information provided to the family caregiver is accurate, and the attendant can do the job that the caregiver needs to be done.

AoA Announces Availability of Approximately $2.25 Million for Lifespan Respite Care Programs

AoA Announces Availability of Approximately $2.25 Million for Lifespan Respite Care Programs

The deadline to apply is June 7, 2010



Mom was the matriarch of the family and basically raised all four of us children by herself, since my Dad worked nights. She ruled with an iron hand and domineered over every aspect of our lives.

My Dad noticed her repeating herself 8 years ago, shortly before he died. Within a couple of years, even though she was still living by herself, I noticed her memory deteriorating.

Introducing In-Home Care When Your Loved One Says "No"

Desperate though caregivers may be for a temporary respite from their care responsibilites, many care recipients are resistant to strangers coming into their home to help. The help may be perceived as an invasion of privacy, a loss of independence or a waste of money. Yet in-home assistance is often critical in offering caregivers a break and time to relax and rejuvenate.

There are ways to make this transition easier. Here are some tips for making your loved one feel more comfortable with in-home help:

Talking with Your Parents About Disability

A caregiver called our office  recently to say his mother was being discharged from the hospital, was no longer able to live alone and needed to hire an attendant. Stressed out and confused, he didn’t know what to do. We asked him what his finances were, so we could give him an appropriate referral. He said he didn’t know—he had never talked with his mother about money.


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