Situational and Long Distance Caregiver

Caregiving with Your Siblings

Introduction

Providing care for your parents can be complicated. When your brothers and sisters are also involved, caregiving can become even more complex. While your siblings can be enormously helpful and your best support, they can also be a source of stress.

In this fact sheet, you will learn how to identify the family dynamics that can impact caregiving, ways your siblings can help, how to increase your chances of getting that help, and how to deal with emotions that arise.

 

In Hindsight, We Were All Slow to the Dance . . .

Gerry Sandusky, left, his wife Lee Ann and their two children Katy and Zack, with Gerry's dad, John Sandusky shortly before his passing.

Downsizing a Home: A Checklist for Caregivers

Introduction

Moving is a high-stress life event, the experts tell us, and they're right. Whether it's cross-town or cross-country, whether to a small apartment or a large suburban home, tackling the organizing, packing, discarding, cleaning, paperwork and the myriad other tasks is a major challenge.

When you're older and moving from the family home to a new smaller residence, possibly in a new community or your adult child's home, sorting through decades of family history and possessions can feel overwhelming—even paralyzing.

Working Successfully with Home Care Services

You are the caregiver who has finally conceded that “outside” help is needed and you’ve taken the plunge. You’ve done your homework (or not) and hired home care workers. You’ve already sorted out whether to use an agency or to hire private contractors. You may have made your decisions with reams of information or with little information at all. Paid caregivers are now in place to help care for your loved one.

Keeping Away the Caregiver Blues

(Aired: July 11, 2006)

Carol Smith, Ph.D., R.N., University of Kansas School of Nursing
Learn about the latest research on why those who care for others often feel sad, guilty and alone...and what we can do to change those feelings. 

 

Download File >  Download (22 mb | .zip)

Talking with Your Parents About Disability

A caregiver called our office recently to say his mother was being discharged from the hospital, was no longer able to live alone, and that he needed to hire an attendant. Stressed out and confused, he didn’t know what to do. We asked him what his finances were, so we could give him an appropriate referral. He said he didn’t know—he had never talked with his mother about money.

Choosing Assistive Technology

Assistive Technology—also called assistive devices, independent living aids, and adaptive equipment—can help your loved one live more independently. It may also make your job as a caregiver easier and more enjoyable.

Handbook for Long-Distance Caregivers

Whether you live an hour away or across the country, this booklet offers a roadmap for those new to the challenges of caring from afar for ill or elderly loved ones. Included: how to assess your care situation; develop a care team; hold a family meeting; access community organizations and private agencies; and balance work and caregiving. (updated 2014)

Traumatic Brain Injury - CA Resources

The following are some of the organizations that provide services to families dealing with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in California:

The Traumatic Brain Injury Services of California
www.tbisca.org

Taking Care of YOU: Self-Care for Family Caregivers

First, Care for Yourself

On an airplane, an oxygen mask descends in front of you. What do you do? As we all know, the first rule is to put on your own oxygen mask before you assist anyone else. Only when we first help ourselves can we effectively help others. Caring for yourself is one of the most important—and one of the most often forgotten—things you can do as a caregiver. When your needs are taken care of, the person you care for will benefit, too.

 

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