Fact Sheets

Caregiver’s Guide to Understanding Dementia Behaviors

Introduction

Advanced Illness: CPR and DNR

Introduction

Caring for Adults with Cognitive and Memory Impairment

Caregiving: A Universal Occupation

Depression and Caregiving

Introduction

Could the sadness, loneliness or anger you feel today be a warning sign of depression? It’s possible. It is not unusual for caregivers to develop mild or more serious depression as a result of the constant demands they face in providing care.

LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions

Introduction

Over the past two decades, as the population of seniors—65+ years—has grown, government (local, state, federal) agencies, nonprofit community organizations, for profit businesses and the media have focused increasing attention on the needs of seniors and those who provide them with support, assistance or care. It is estimated that by 2050 the population of people over 65 will be 20.9% of the population. These are startling numbers effecting everyone in the United States.

Legal Issues for LGBT Caregivers

Introduction

Advanced Illness: Holding On and Letting Go

Introduction

Our culture tells us that we should fight hard against age, illness and death: "Do not go gentle into that good night," Dylan Thomas wrote. And holding on to life, to our loved ones, is indeed a basic human instinct. However, as an illness advances, "raging against the dying of the light" often begins to cause undue suffering, and "letting go" may instead feel like the next stage.

Selected Long-Term Care Statistics

What is Long-Term Care?

Incidence and Prevalence of the Major Causes of Brain Impairment

Overview

Many of the diseases and disorders that affect the brain are progressive and their incidence and prevalence increase with age. Caring for those with adult-onset brain impairments frequently becomes a 24-hour, 7-day a week role. As the population ages, the need for care and for understanding the impact of these disorders on families becomes even more pressing.

Work and Eldercare

Introduction

More than ever before, caregiving is recognized as a key element of everyday life for millions of families throughout the United States. As our population ages, more families are providing care for an older adult at home, and an increasing number of people will need such care in the future. Current demographic and healthcare trends make this issue even more significant:

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