Fact Sheets

Hypoxic-Anoxic Brain Injury

Introduction and Definition

The brain requires a constant flow of oxygen to function normally. A hypoxic-anoxic injury, also known as HAI, occurs when that flow is disrupted, essentially starving the brain and preventing it from performing vital biochemical processes. Hypoxic refers to a partial lack of oxygen; anoxic means a total lack. In general, the more complete the deprivation, the more severe the harm to the brain and the greater the consequences.

Frontotemporal Dementia

Definition

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a degenerative condition of the front (anterior) part of the brain. It differs from other causes of dementia such as Alzheimer’s, Lewy body, and Creutzfeldt Jakob’s diseases. FTD is currently understood as a clinical syndrome that groups together Pick's disease, primary progressive aphasia, and semantic dementia. The areas of the brain affected by FTD—the frontal and anterior temporal lobes—control reasoning, personality, movement, speech, social graces, language, and some aspects of memory.

Dementia with Lewy Bodies

Definition

Brain Tumor

Introduction

A brain tumor is a collection of damaged cells that multiply out of control within the brain. Also called a neoplasm, growth, mass, or lesion, a brain tumor is classified as either primary or secondary (metastatic), and can be benign or malignant.

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

What Is ALS?

La Apoplejia o Derrame Cerebral (Stroke)

Definición

Un derrame cerebral es una lesión cerebral, que se produce cuando se interrumpe o se reduce ampliamente el riego sanguíneo del cerebro; éste se queda sin oxígeno ni nutrientes y, en cuestión de minutos, comienzan a morir las células cerebrales. Por lo tanto, un derrame cerebral se considera una emergencia médica y requiere que se lo diagnostique y se lo trate sin demora.

Opciones para el final de la vida: RCP y ONR (CPR & DNR)

Introducción

Evaluating Medical Research Findings and Clinical Trials

Introduction

Hardly a day goes by without a story on television, in the newspaper, or on the Internet about new medical research findings. You might hear about a new drug to treat Alzheimer’s, a promising “cure” for cancer, or a breakthrough discovery in Parkinson’s disease. Or you might see articles about particular foods or dietary supplements that are said to promote health or prevent or slow the course of illness. Should you try to get these drugs for a family member who is sick? Should the person change his diet? Take more vitamins?

LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions

Introduction

Over the past two decades, as the population of seniors—65+ years—has grown, government (local, state, federal) agencies, nonprofit community organizations, for-profit businesses, and the media have focused increasing attention on the needs of seniors and those who provide them with support, assistance, or care. It is estimated that by 2050 the population of people over 65 will be 20.9% of the population. These are startling numbers affecting everyone in the United States.

Legal Issues for LGBT Caregivers

Introduction

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