Fact Sheets

Hypoxic-Anoxic Brain Injury

Introduction and Definition

The brain requires a constant flow of oxygen to function normally. A hypoxic-anoxic injury, also known as HAI, occurs when that flow is disrupted, essentially starving the brain and preventing it from performing vital biochemical processes. Hypoxic refers to a partial lack of oxygen; anoxic means a total lack. In general, the more complete the deprivation, the more severe the harm to the brain and the greater the consequences.

Frontotemporal Dementia

Definition

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a degenerative condition of the front (anterior) part of the brain. It differs from other causes of dementia such as Alzheimer’s, Lewy body, and Creutzfeldt Jakob’s diseases. FTD is currently understood as a clinical syndrome that groups together Pick's disease, primary progressive aphasia, and semantic dementia. The areas of the brain affected by FTD—the frontal and anterior temporal lobes—control reasoning, personality, movement, speech, social graces, language, and some aspects of memory.

Dementia with Lewy Bodies

Definition

Brain Tumor

Introduction

A brain tumor is a collection of damaged cells that multiply out of control within the brain. Also called a neoplasm, growth, mass, or lesion, a brain tumor is classified as either primary or secondary (metastatic), and can be benign or malignant.

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

What Is ALS?

La Apoplejia o Derrame Cerebral (Stroke)

Definición

Un derrame cerebral es una lesión cerebral, que se produce cuando se interrumpe o se reduce ampliamente el riego sanguíneo del cerebro; éste se queda sin oxígeno ni nutrientes y, en cuestión de minutos, comienzan a morir las células cerebrales. Por lo tanto, un derrame cerebral se considera una emergencia médica y requiere que se lo diagnostique y se lo trate sin demora.

Opciones para el final de la vida: RCP y ONR (CPR & DNR)

Introducción

Selected Long-Term Care Statistics

What is Long-Term Care?

Hiring In-Home Help

It is easy for family and friends, as well as professionals, to suggest finding someone to help with housekeeping tasks and care responsibilities. Having someone else take on some of your housekeeping or personal care tasks might sound appealing to you too. But what does it mean to have someone in your house “to help” you? Where do you begin to find someone? Can you afford it? How do you respond to your loved one who proclaims that they don’t want “a stranger” in the house? This fact sheet will help guide you through the process of hiring help at home.*

Caregiver’s Guide to Understanding Dementia Behaviors

Introduction

Pages

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