Fact Sheets

Depression and Caregiving

Introduction

Grief and Loss

Introduction

Evaluating Medical Research Findings and Clinical Trials

Introduction

Hardly a day goes by without a story on television, in the newspaper, or on the Internet about new medical research findings. You might hear about a new drug to treat Alzheimer’s, a promising “cure” for cancer, or a breakthrough discovery in Parkinson’s disease. Or you might see articles about particular foods or dietary supplements that are said to promote health or prevent or slow the course of illness. Should you try to get these drugs for a family member who is sick? Should the person change his diet? Take more vitamins?

Work and Eldercare

Introduction

More than ever before, caregiving is recognized as a key element of everyday life for millions of families throughout the United States. As our population ages, more families are providing care for an older adult at home, and an increasing number of people will need such care in the future. Current demographic and healthcare trends make this issue even more significant.

Legal Issues for LGBT Caregivers

Introduction

LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions

Introduction

Over the past two decades, as the population of seniors—65+ years—has grown, government (local, state, federal) agencies, nonprofit community organizations, for-profit businesses, and the media have focused increasing attention on the needs of seniors and those who provide them with support, assistance, or care. It is estimated that by 2050 the population of people over 65 will be 20.9% of the population. These are startling numbers affecting everyone in the United States.

Caring for Adults with Cognitive and Memory Impairment

Caregiving: A Universal Occupation

Dementia, Driving, and California State Law

Driving and Dementia

Dementia and Driving

When an individual is diagnosed with dementia, one of the first concerns that families and caregivers face is whether or not that person should drive. A diagnosis of dementia may not mean that a person can no longer drive safely. In the early stages of dementia, some—though not all—individuals may still possess skills necessary for safe driving. Most dementia, however, is progressive, meaning that symptoms such as memory loss, visual-spatial disorientation, and decreased cognitive function will worsen over time.

Coping with Behavior Problems after Head Injury

Identifying Behavior Problems

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