Looks Good

Evaluating Medical Research

Hardly a day goes by without a story on television, in the newspaper, or on the Internet about new medical research findings. You might hear about a new drug to treat Alzheimer’s, a promising “cure” for cancer, or a breakthrough discovery in Parkinson’s disease. Or you might see articles about particular foods or dietary supplements that are said to promote health or prevent or slow the course of an illness. Should you try to get these drugs for a family member who is sick? Should the person change his diet? Take more vitamins?

National Consensus Project for Caregiver Assessment

National Consensus Project for Caregiver Assessment: Translating Research into Policy and Practice

Routinely, people with chronic or disabling conditions are assessed by professionals in medical, health and social service settings to determine what services or treatments they need. Family caregivers, however, have not had the same experience.


What Do We Mean By.....

Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) – everyday tasks related to personal care usually performed for oneself in the course of a normal day, including bathing, dressing, grooming, eating, walking, taking medications, and other personal care activities.

Ten Real-Life Strategies for Dementia Caregiving

As caregivers, we often use intuition to help us decide what to do. No one ever gave us lessons on how to relate to someone with memory loss. Unfortunately, dealing with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is counter-intuitive; i.e., often the right thing to do is exactly opposite that which seems like the right thing to do. Here is some practical advice:

Caregiving and the holidays: from stress to success!

For many caregivers the holiday season gives rise to stress, frustration and anger, instead of peace and good will.

Caregivers may feel resentful towards other family members who they feel have not offered enough assistance. Managing care for someone who has a cognitive impairment may leave caregivers feeling that they will not be able to participate as fully as they would like in family gatherings. Already feeling overwhelmed with caregiving tasks, stressed-out caregivers may view traditional holiday preparations as more of a drain of precious energy than a joy.

Traumatic Brain Injury - CA Resources

The following are some of the organizations that provide services to families dealing with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in California:

The Traumatic Brain Injury Services of California

Caregivers' Guide to Medications and Aging

Medications: A Double-Edged Sword

“Any symptom in an elderly patient should be considered a drug side effect until proved otherwise.”
Brown University Long-term Care Quality Letter, 1995.

FAQ: "Care"(Long-distance Caregiving)

Dear FCA:

I live in California and my mother, who has just been diagnosed with probable Alzheimer's, lives in New York City. She doesn't want to come and live with me, and I have a job and children and am not free to travel to the East very much. My brother lives in New Jersey, but can't take responsibility for my mother's care. Mom can still live on her own for now, but she needs some help and someone to check up on her. Do you have a suggestion on what I can do 3000 miles away?

Taking Care of YOU: Self-Care for Family Caregivers

First, Care for Yourself

On an airplane, an oxygen mask descends in front of you. What do you do? As we all know, the first rule is to put on your own oxygen mask before you assist anyone else. Only when we first help ourselves can we effectively help others. Caring for yourself is one of the most important—and one of the most often forgotten—things you can do as a caregiver. When your needs are taken care of, the person you care for will benefit, too.

Home Away from Home: Relocating Your Parents

Home Away from Home: Relocating Your Parents

As you've watched your parents get older, perhaps you have struggled with situations such as these:


Subscribe to RSS - Looks Good

Sponsors & Special Events