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Una Guia para Cuidadores

“Cuidar de uno mismo es fundamental si cuidas de un ser querido,” dijo una hija que cuida de su madre. Aunque es muy fácil decirlo, la aceptación e integración de este consejo puede ser mucho más difícil. Muchos cuidadores no tienen el tiempo para pensar en más que las tareas que les esperan cada mañana y se olvidan de incluir tiempo para sí mismos en la lista de cosas que necesitan hacer durante el día.

Contacting State Elected Officials in California

If you would like to contact your elected representative in the California legislature and need the name and address, please go to: http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/yourleg.html for a current listing.

If you need information about general advocacy, please refer to FCA's Fact Sheet on Advocacy Tips.

Ask an Expert: Repeating

Dear FCA:

My husband Ted had a series of mini-strokes. He can carry on a conversation some times. But other times I've noticed that Ted gets "stuck" on a subject and tends to repeat the same thing over and over again. He could ask when dinner is 25 times or more. It's so frustrating. I don't know what to do to get through to him. If I get angry, it just seems to make him upset too. Can you offer me any advice?

FAQ: "Agitated"

Dear FCA:

My mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease two years ago. Recently I've noticed that Mom gets very agitated in the early part of the evening. She seems nervous, paces the floor anxiously, and has become both more confused and more combative. I am having a hard time coping with these new behaviors. Is there anything I can do?

Caregiving and sibling relationships: challenges and opportunities

Your mother has been diagnosed with dementia and it is clear that she can no longer live alone. You feel that an assisted living facility is the best care option, but your brother disagrees. Every conversation you have with him seems to lead to confrontation and hurt feelings….

Sexuality and Dementia

Coping with Changes in Your Intimate Relationship 

How has your relationship with your partner changed as a result of disease? Physicians seem reluctant to address this question with caregivers dealing with a long-term chronic illness.

"No one asked me about my marriage or sexuality. Yet it plays a large part in our well being. No one asked me, 'what's the quality of your life?' … I'm a sexual individual. I'm 76 years old and I'm still alive," said Jerry, who cared for his wife with dementia.

Hands-On Skills for Caregivers

When you’re a caregiver, finding time to take care of your own physical needs is difficult enough, but taking care of the physical needs of someone else is even more challenging. Assisting someone else to dress, bathe, sit or stand when they are upset, agitated or combative—often the case when caring for someone with a brain disorder such as Alzheimer’s disease—requires special strategies. The following five techniques can make taking care of a loved one’s physical needs easier.

A Guide to Taking Care of Yourself

"The care you give to yourself is the care you give to your loved one," said a caregiver. Absolutely the easiest thing for someone to say and the hardest thing to accept is the advice to take care of yourself as a caregiver. It is often hard to see beyond the care tasks that await you each morning.

Changing Places: Should Your Parents Move in with You?

Lisa's mother, Ruth, has been living alone since her father died five years ago. Ruth has been active at church and eats lunch at the local senior center a couple of times a week. Lisa does the food shopping, takes Ruth to doctors' appointments and has her over to her house for dinner, usually once a week.

Caregiver Depression: A Silent Health Crisis

One of today’s all-too silent health crises is caregiver depression. A conservative estimate reports that 20% of family caregivers suffer from depression, twice the rate of the general population. Of clients of California’s Caregiver Resource Centers, nearly 60% show clinical signs of depression. And former caregivers may not escape the tentacles of this condition after caregiving ends. A recent study found that 41% of former caregivers of a spouse with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia experienced mild to severe depression up to three years after their spouse had died.

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