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FAQ: "Agitated"

Dear FCA:

My mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease two years ago. Recently I've noticed that Mom gets very agitated in the early part of the evening. She seems nervous, paces the floor anxiously, and has become both more confused and more combative. I am having a hard time coping with these new behaviors. Is there anything I can do?

Caregiving and sibling relationships: challenges and opportunities

Your mother has been diagnosed with dementia and it is clear that she can no longer live alone. You feel that an assisted living facility is the best care option, but your brother disagrees. Every conversation you have with him seems to lead to confrontation and hurt feelings….

Estrategias para motivar a su ser querido (Strategies for motivating your loved on)

Es fácil que una persona de la tercera edad que está enferma llegue a sentirse deprimida y que su vida se centre entorno a su enfermedad. En muchos sentidos, la casa donde el individuo está confinado se convierte en un mundo. Frecuentemente, las únicas salidas de casa son las visitas al médico y los únicos cambios que ocurren en la vida inmediata son causados por aspectos relacionados con la enfermedad.

Derechos del cuidador (Caregiver Rights)

Como cuidador, yo...

Consejos para la seguridad (Safety Tips)

A fin de reducir el riesgo de accidentes y mantener el hogar seguro para tu ser querido, es importante seguir una serie de consejos.

Preste atención a posibles peligros como:

Sexuality and Dementia

Coping with Changes in Your Intimate Relationship 

How has your relationship with your partner changed as a result of disease? Physicians seem reluctant to address this question with caregivers dealing with a long-term chronic illness.

Caregiver Depression: A Silent Health Crisis

One of today’s all-too silent health crises is caregiver depression. A conservative estimate reports that 20% of family caregivers suffer from depression, twice the rate of the general population. Of clients of California’s Caregiver Resource Centers, nearly 60% show clinical signs of depression. And former caregivers may not escape the tentacles of this condition after caregiving ends. A recent study found that 41% of former caregivers of a spouse with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia experienced mild to severe depression up to three years after their spouse had died.

A Guide to Taking Care of Yourself

The care you give to yourself is the care you give to your loved one,

Changing Places: Should Your Parents Move in with You?

Lisa's mother, Ruth, has been living alone since her father died five years ago. Ruth has been active at church and eats lunch at the local senior center a couple of times a week. Lisa does the food shopping, takes Ruth to doctors’ appointments, and has her over to her house for dinner, usually once a week.

Hands-On Skills for Caregivers

When you’re a caregiver, finding time to take care of your own physical needs is difficult enough, but taking care of the physical needs of someone else is even more challenging. Assisting someone else to dress, bathe, sit, or stand when they are upset, agitated, or combative—often the case when caring for someone with a brain disorder such as Alzheimer’s disease—requires special strategies. The following five techniques can make taking care of a loved one’s physical needs easier.

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