Looks Good

Caring for Someone with Incontinence: Emotional and Social Issues

When asked, many family and partner caregivers say that heavy incontinence would tip their decision towards moving a loved one to a nursing home. What makes this such an emotionally difficult turning point? Incontinence can be the last straw in a stressful caregiving situation. Covered below are some of the issues that make incontinence so difficult to deal with, and tips on how to cope with these concerns.

Living with Incontinence: Social and Emotional Challenges

Most people who live with incontinence do not tell anyone about it, often not even their doctor(s) and especially not their friends. Family members might be the ones to bring up the subject, especially if the house is beginning to smell or furniture is soiled. It’s not an easy conversation to have.  If you are faced with incontinence, know that you are not alone. One in 15 million Americans are searching for ways to deal with this very personal issue. Here are typical feelings associated with continence issues and some coping strategies to consider:

Special Concerns of LGBT Caregivers


As Americans live longer, greater attention is being paid to the concerns facing aging adults and caregivers. While many issues are the same for all older adults and those who care for them, some unique considerations arise for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people dealing with aging.


Caregiver Health

A Population at Risk

An estimated 44 million Americans age 18 and older provide unpaid assistance and support to older people and adults with disabilities who live in the community.1 The value of this unpaid labor force is estimated to be at least $306 billion annually,2 nearly double the combined costs of home health care ($43 billion) and nursing home care ($115 billion).3

Caregiving With Your Siblings


Providing care for your parents can be complicated. When your brothers and sisters are also involved, caregiving can become even more complex. While your siblings can be enormously helpful and your best support, they can also be a source of stress.

In this Fact Sheet you will learn how to identify the family dynamics that can impact caregiving, ways your siblings can help, how to increase your chances of getting that help, and how to deal with emotions that arise.


Focus on Texas: Caregiver Assessments

This webinar took place on September 20, 2011.

Family Caregiver Alliance sponsored a webinar focused on the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) and efforts to implement a caregiver status questionnaire in its Medicaid functional eligibility determination process for HCBS as well as a caregiver assessment in the Older Americans Act, Title III-E programs. The process began in 2009.

Creativity & Aging Webinar: Creativity, Communication and Dementia

This webinar took place in December 6, 2011.

Two professionals in the aging field, Drs. Gay Hanna and Anne Basting, will discuss (1) the importance of increasing awareness among arts and aging professionals, family caregivers and others about the link between the arts and wellness in older adults; and (2) TimeSlips, a current program which has been effective with older adults with dementia.

Webinar: Caregiver Assessment II - Practice Considerations for System Change

(Part 2 of a 2-part series)

This webinar took place on August 23, 2012.

Webinar: Caregiver Assessment I - Why and What Should We Assess?

This webinar took place on June 20, 2012. It is Part 1 of a 2-part series.

Caregiving 101: Exploring the Complexities of Family Caregiving


Subscribe to RSS - Looks Good