Looks Good

Paid Family Leave goes into effect in California

A statewide coalition of organizations (including FCA) held a well-attended press conference last summer in Sacramento to launch California’s Paid Family Leave program, the first such law in the country. The new legislation, sponsored by State Sen. Sheila Kuehl, has attracted widespread attention throughout the US. Several other states are now contemplating similar measures.

Ask FCA

Q: My father, 82, is living independently in his own home but needs help. He has agreed to have someone help in his home, to do some cooking, housekeeping, shopping and laundry. This will cost about $960 per month and his income from his pension and Social Security is only $1500 per month. He will need about an extra $1000 each month to cover his expenses. Is there help available to pay for the attendant so that he can stay at home?

Subscribe to Policy Digest!

Caregving PolicyDigest

This free, focused email newsletter from FCA’s  National Center on Caregiving offers a fresh look at the rapidly changing environment of caregiving. Twice a month—or as developments occur—you’ll receive news about innovative programs, key legislation, policy developments at the national and state levels and latest research.

To subscribe, click here.

Medications: A double-edged sword

“Any symptom in an elderly patient should be considered a drug side effect until proved otherwise.”
Brown University
Long-term Care Quality Letter, 1995.

Controlling Frustration: A Class for Caregivers (Manuals)

Leader's manual describes the methods for conducting an 8-week class that teaches family caregivers the basic steps for learning to relax, to control their negative thoughts, and to act assertively when necessary. Participant's manual includes exercises and homework assignments to supplement the classes. Available in both English and Spanish.

Order This Publication

Communicating with Your Doctor

When was the last time you left a doctor visit feeling satisfied that your concerns were heard and responded to? Successful communication with your doctor demands effective two-way communication. Here are a few tips to consider:

Downsizing a Home: A Checklist for Caregivers

Introduction

Moving is a high-stress life event, the experts tell us, and they're right. Whether it's cross-town or cross-country, whether to a small apartment or a large suburban home, tackling the organizing, packing, discarding, cleaning, paperwork and the myriad other tasks is a major challenge.

When you're older and moving from the family home to a new smaller residence, possibly in a new community or your adult child's home, sorting through decades of family history and possessions can feel overwhelming—even paralyzing.

Dental Care (for dementia)

  • Dental hygiene is important for overall health. Poor dental hygiene may lead to heart disease, gingivitis, stroke, osteoporosis, and respiratory disease. In addition to causing bad breath, inadequate dental hygiene can also affect one's ability to eat, chew, and talk. Certain medications can cause "dry mouth." Dry mouth makes it more difficult to eat and swallow, produce saliva, and causes tongue irritation.
     

Communication (for dementia)

  • People respond to our body posture, facial expression, and tone of voice more than our actual words. Your upbeat mood can help keep the person you are dealing with remain calmer.
  • You need to pay attention to the non-verbal clues the person you are caring for is giving you. Understanding his/her feelings may be more important than the content of the conversation. Acknowledge feelings whenever possible.

Dressing and Grooming (for dementia)

  • Simplify clothing choices by putting out an outfit for the care receiver to wear, or give an option of two outfits. Do not ask open-ended questions like, "What do you want to wear?"—this kind of question can overwhelm someone with dementia.
     

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Looks Good