Behavior Management

Montessori-based Activity Program

The Montessori Program at Family and Children's Services' Adult Day Services at West End Place studies the impact of using the Montessori Method with adults with mild to moderate dementia.

Organization:

Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland, Inc.

Dental Care (for dementia)

  • Dental hygiene is important for overall health. Poor dental hygiene may lead to heart disease, gingivitis, stroke, osteoporosis, and respiratory disease. In addition to causing bad breath, inadequate dental hygiene can also affect one's ability to eat, chew, and talk. Certain medications can cause "dry mouth." Dry mouth makes it more difficult to eat and swallow, produce saliva, and causes tongue irritation.
     

Communication (for dementia)

  • People respond to our body posture, facial expression, and tone of voice more than our actual words. Your upbeat mood can help keep the person you are dealing with remain calmer.
  • You need to pay attention to the non-verbal clues the person you are caring for is giving you. Understanding his/her feelings may be more important than the content of the conversation. Acknowledge feelings whenever possible.

Dressing and Grooming (for dementia)

  • Simplify clothing choices by putting out an outfit for the care receiver to wear, or give an option of two outfits. Do not ask open-ended questions like, "What do you want to wear?"—this kind of question can overwhelm someone with dementia.
     

Toileting (for dementia)

  • Set up the bathroom to make it as easy as possible for the person to get on to and off of the toilet, e.g. having a raised toilet seat and grab bars.
     
  • Notice when the person gives a sign about needing to use the toilet, e.g. agitation, fidgeting, tugging on clothing, wandering, touching the genital area. Have a routine and take the person to the bathroom on a regular schedule, e.g. every two hours. You may have to respond quickly if someone indicates they need to use the bathroom.
     

Incontinence (for dementia)

Talk to the physician to see if medication, enlarged prostate or a urinary tract infection might be causing the problem, especially if there is a sudden onset of incontinence.
 

Ten Real-Life Strategies for Dementia Caregiving

As caregivers, we often use intuition to help us decide what to do. No one ever gave us lessons on how to relate to someone with memory loss. Unfortunately, dealing with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is counterintuitive; i.e., often the right thing to do is exactly opposite that which seems like the right thing to do. Here is some practical advice:

行为控制策略(痴呆) (Behavior Management Strategies for Dementia)

The following Fact Sheet is available as downloadable PDF document. To view and print this file you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader. It is available as a free download by clicking here.

Caregiving FAQs

Have a question you would like to pose to our staff on care issues, use of community services, caregiver programs in your state or other caregiving issues? Just e-mail us at [email protected] with your question and your location and our social workers and resource specialists will respond! You can also visit our Family Care Navigator, State-by-State Help for Family Caregivers, to find resources in your state.

 

FAQ: "Agitated"

Dear FCA:

My mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease two years ago. Recently I've noticed that Mom gets very agitated in the early part of the evening. She seems nervous, paces the floor anxiously, and has become both more confused and more combative. I am having a hard time coping with these new behaviors. Is there anything I can do?

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