Alzheimer's Association

Provides reliable information, care consultation and supportive services for dementia caregivers through state and local chapters. The website also includes an interactive tool, CareFinder, which helps families to:
- Recognize dementia care
- Plan and pay for care
- Communicate with care providers
- Find local support and resources

ALS Association

Provides help to ALS patients and their families through research, patient and community services, public education, and advocacy. Includes a nationwide network of 30 certified ALS clinics which provide state-of-the-art, multidisciplinary ALS care and services.

Caregivers Count Too! Section 2: Why Are Family Caregivers Vital?

Why Family Caregivers are Vital to Health Care and Long-Term Care

Many people rely on them . . .

  • Most people (80%) who need LTC supportive services live at home or in community settings, not in institutions.
  • More than 78% of adults who receive LTC at home get all their care from unpaid family and friends.

Family caregivers fill big gaps in health and long-term care . . .

Caregivers Count Too! Section 1: Definitions

What Do We Mean By.....

Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) – everyday tasks related to personal care usually performed for oneself in the course of a normal day, including bathing, dressing, grooming, eating, walking, taking medications, and other personal care activities.

Be Wise, Immunize! - Chinese

A Physician's View of Caregiver Health

A legislative hearing before the Senate Subcommittee on Aging and Long-Term Care in Sacramento focused attention on strategies to support family caregivers in California. (See story, Legislative Hearing Shines Spotlight on Caregiver Health). The session looked at future and current caregiver needs and the unique demographic trends that impact this important public health issue. Dr. Moira Fordyce was a key spokesperson. Below is her testimony.

Senator Alquist and Members of the Subcommittee:

Creating Peer-to-Peer Support Groups for Caregivers

Toileting (for dementia)

  • Set up the bathroom to make it as easy as possible for the person to get on to and off of the toilet, e.g. having a raised toilet seat and grab bars.
  • Notice when the person gives a sign about needing to use the toilet, e.g. agitation, fidgeting, tugging on clothing, wandering, touching the genital area. Have a routine and take the person to the bathroom on a regular schedule, e.g. every two hours. You may have to respond quickly if someone indicates they need to use the bathroom.

How to Pay for the High Cost of Long-Term Care Without Going Broke

Gilbert Awards 2009: Ceremony


Three Outstanding Programs


Receive Their Awards!


2008 Awardees



"... Art has an integral role to play in [...] enriching the lives of people affected by dementia and their caregivers. We are honored to accept this visionary award in the category of Creative Expression and thank the Alliance and the Foundation..."


Amir Parsa
Meet Me at MoMA



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