Autism Cannot Define You

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Michaela Withers, Tennessee

I am a young mother of an autistic boy. He’s four years old; his name is Drayton and has a problem communicating. I noticed when he was about one he may had have a problem, he stopped talking and was banging his head on the floor and walls. As going through the process to determine his disability it was kinda heartbreaking because of the cruel world we live in today. But as of today he is saying a few words, does not like too many loud noises or a lot people around at once. It’s so hard to take him in a store and then others not aware of the situations I am put in everytime I take him in public are quick to judge me and my son. He goes to therapy and goes to school. But I do fear what will happen when he gets up in higher grades at school. He likes everything a certain way. His food, the way he sleeps, what he wears, and even how a pillow can be sitting the wrong way. As his caregiver I learn more about how he thinks or sees the world. He sees no pain or no worries and on my shoulders is all the worries in the world. Autistic kids are awesome and funny. I am a caregiver because I will not give up on my son; even on his worst days I want to cry with him because I wished I could see and feel everything from his view.