FCA Blog

Caregiver Wisdom: Emotional Care + Physical Care

Family Caregiver Alliance

The first Year after I started caring for my wife (two strokes at age 39 and 43 yrs) at home I thought that she was the same person I knew before the issues occurred.  I would become angry with her for "doing this to me", when, in fact, she wasn't doing anything  consciously.

Caregiver Wisdom: Reaching the “End of the Road” with Peace & Dignity 


Family Caregiver Alliance

Deciding on the right kind of care for your situation

I get very upset when one kind of caregiving is seen as "better" than other kinds. I have seen person after person (including myself) agonize over a decision to place their loved one in a SNF (skilled nursing facility) with some others expressing pride in being the "best" caregiver because they keep their loved one at home.  This is pure bunk and unfair to everyone who has to make these horrible choices.

Caregiver Wisdom . . . on Control

We Caregivers Are Not the Ones in Control... I have learned in Caregiving that we Caregivers are not the ones in control.  There is no such thing as control for us.  We don't make people sick or well, we only help them as they go through either.  So, all we can possibly do is the very best we can.  Most of us are not trained Medical Professionals anyway, and they mess up a lot.  Still, all you can possibly do is the best you can.  You have no responsibility beyond that if you have done all you can do.

Caregiver Wisdom: The Really Good Caregiver

Family Caregiver Alliance

From the voice of a family caregiver

Dear Caregivers,

I feel there is a tendency to think that only caregiving at home from the beginning of an illness to the end of someone's life is the best care.  And somehow that your devotion and love for someone is only measured by how long you can stand taking care of them. And that that care should only conclude when they pass away at home.  I think this is some really unrealistic thinking.

The Post Discharge Checklist: 5 Important Steps

Two weeks ago, Andrew’s elderly father suffered a heart attack. After undergoing bypass surgery, he is being released to return home. While his father is eager to get out of the hospital and back to the comfort of home, Andrew is hesitant about the transition. There are new medications to take, new specialists to see, and his father requires more assistance with daily activities than he did prior to the heart attack. While he’s pleased that his father is well enough to go home, Andrew’s not quite sure how to handle caregiving after the hospital discharge.

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