Sometimes we can even find friends or neighbors that have the same in common

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Lisa Stufft, South Carolina

When our caregiving journey first began, it was pleasant and pretty cool. Started commuting from my apartment visiting both of my folks helping with bringing dinner, doing laundry, etc. One day at work, got a phone call saying my mom needed emergency surgery and eventually ended up having to leave work permanently. Her health condition declined off and on from then on for several years.

Ended up moving back in with them to help more. Dad and her did ok for a while, but he had also had heart attack, etc. So, it took both of us as she eventually ended up in a wheelchair and bedridden.

We could not have done it without home health, their doctors, and staff. Even nursing facilities and hospitals were helpful for advice on taking care of both of them. It was also encouraging as was taking a medical transcription course.

Think the hardest thing was when we had to get hospice for Mom and things kind of went downhill from there. Just thought she was going to be around for a little longer. As good to her as they were, it was uncomfortable but better for her to be home.

Am grateful to still have my dad although he is aging, a little Alzheimer's and has a walker now. For 88 years old, that is not so bad. Have a brother who is a long distance caregiver, but at least have some moral support.

Although it is a little stressful, am hoping others can hang in there as there a lot more online resources available for those in rural areas. Sometimes we can even find friends or neighbors that have the same in common.